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Reality - The Life and Thoughts of Zach — LiveJournal

Feb. 28th, 2006

06:51 pm - Reality

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From:zarfmouse
Date:March 1st, 2006 01:25 am (UTC)
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That example you made is neat.

The thing that blows my mind is that I expect the kind of lighting and shadow manipulation that you've done in your example. I don't expect the gross manipulation of body shape. There are so many of those examples on that site where they have changed the size of a waist or thigh by INCHES. If celebs consistently have their image manipulated like this, I wonder how they get away with appearing in TV and movies or at live events?

I think this must be an excellent example of the kind of error correction our brain does to our memory and perception. Since the "ugly" features of these people are actually very normal we don't consciously notice their presense or absense unless we see the before/after side by side. See a star in real life and you're mostly thinking "wow, I'm seeing a STAR!" rather than "huh, her arm is an inch thicker than in that photo I saw". And after that moment in your MEMORY your image of the moment gets squished together with other images you've seen. So you'll remember the star as basically the same shape in all the media you've seen them in. Only side by side or with conscious knowledge of digitial manipulation does the observer realize they've been duped.

I wonder how much of this kind of extreme digital manipulation is done to "beautiful" stars in high budget mainstream movies.
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From:skywind8
Date:March 1st, 2006 02:01 am (UTC)
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I think this must be an excellent example of the kind of error correction our brain does to our memory and perception.

Yes, exactly. We do not perceive 2D images the same way as 3D reality - we only think we do. Anyone who has tried to do serious drawing, especially figure drawing, begins to learn how inaccurate our brains are about interpretting visual imagery. Likewise someone who is significantly trained in visual art (photographers, painters, sketch artists, retouch artists) becomes a bit more able to see the real cues. Otherwise we habitually look right past them.

I bet you have some friends who you haven't consciously realized wear glasses, or couldn't recall for sure whether they were wearing them last time you saw them. Our brains filter a lot.

I have no idea how much retouch is possible in film. But my sister might know - she's a theater major and has had some exposure to it. I may ask her next time we talk.
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From:tinyshel
Date:March 1st, 2006 12:20 pm (UTC)
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The thing that blows my mind is that I expect the kind of lighting and shadow manipulation that you've done in your example. I don't expect the gross manipulation of body shape.

This was my exact reaction. I found it absolutely terrifying!
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